Baby Boomers Warned About Over-Drinking as Alcohol-Related Deaths Soar

Wine Glass

Don’t shoot the messenger, but baby boomers are hitting the bottle at alarming levels.

Just this week, baby boomers received new warnings about alcohol as people aged 50-plus deaths linked to alcohol soared. The number of deaths attributed solely to alcohol has increased 45% since 2001, according to a report published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) on Tuesday.

While this study was based in the UK, baby boomers in America don’t fare any better. One out of every eight Americans has an alcohol disorder, according to a study published in August 2017 in the Journal of the American Medical Association’s Psychiatry. While the survey showed alcohol disorders increased for the US population in general, some of the sharpest increases were among baby boomers. For example, high risk alcohol use increased 65.2 percent  and alcoholism rose 106.7 percent for the over 65 crowd during the last decade.

By 2020 the number of people receiving treatment for substance misuse problems is expected to double in Europe, and treble in the US, among those aged over 50.

This is bad news for baby boomers since alcohol is linked to more than 60 illnesses and diseases including heart disease, liver disease, cancer, and dementia.

Why Are Baby Boomers Drinking Too Much?

We were the generation famous for drinking a martini or Manhattan after work as often shown on the TV show Madmen. But is there more to this growing problem of alcohol misuse? Probably.

This blog was inspired by reports that baby boomers, especially those in their 50s and 60s, are statistically the unhappiest age group. Many boomers face stressful events such as declining health, raising teenagers, looming college tuitions, adult children moving back home, caring for aging parents, menopause, the loss of a loved one, and social isolation.

Add to that financial stress. According to a poll by AARP, baby boomers are more worried than any other age group about retirement security. Many boomers confess they didn’t put enough money aside for retirement and find themselves heading toward their golden years with mortgage and credit card debt.

All of this worry, stress, and depression can easily trigger the misuse of alcohol if not kept in check.

Another factor may go back to the disappointment of our generation that expected a better world. “What does alcohol mean to our generation?” asks Christina Fraser, a relationship counselor with Coupleworks and herself a baby boomer. “We drink to fill a void. Our parents had a job, retired and dropped dead two years later. They worked hard and had fewer opportunities. The baby boomers were given the promise of a world that was full of possibilities. Instead, we are seeing that world close in.”

What is Considered Over-Drinking?

Baby boomers who love wine o’clock may be shocked to hear what is considered over-drinking.  Moderate drinking is one drink a day for women and two drinks per day for men. So maybe you’re thinking you don’t drink everyday, mostly just on weekends.

Do the math. Women are considered “heavy drinkers” if they have eight or more drinks a week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Men can have 14.

A standard “drink,” by the way, is not that big wine glass filled to the tippy top, a huge frosty mug, or giant Hurricane glass. The CDC says a drink is 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor. If you pour more than these standard serving sizes, it counts for more than one drink.

While studies show that moderate alcohol consumption can be part of a healthy lifestyle for many people, those benefits quickly turn into health risks. These dangers include an increased risk of cancer, heart, and liver disease.

In fact, on the heels of the new study warning baby boomers to stop over-drinking, comes another statement from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) that “even light drinking increases your risk of cancer.” ABC News’ chief medical correspondent, Dr. Jennifer Ashton, said that alcohol has been a known human carcinogen, or known to cause cancer, for a long time within the medical community.

Moderate drinkers nearly double their risk for mouth and throat cancer and more than double the risk of esophagus cancer compared to nondrinkers. They also face elevated risks for cancer o the voice box, breast cancer and colorectal cancer.

The risk for heavy drinkers is much higher and downright sobering (excuse the pun). Heavy drinkers face roughly five times the risk of mouth and throat cancers and squamous cell esophageal cancers than nondrinkers, nearly three times the risk of cancers of the voice box, double the risk of liver cancer, as well as increased risks for breast cancer and colorectal cancer.

Ways to Cut Back

So we baby boomers have been put on notice. How can we scale back on alcohol use?

  • Cut down the number of days you drink alcohol. In fact, you may want to abstain for a week or a month to see how you feel physically and emotionally without alcohol in your life.
  • Reduce the amount of alcohol you drink at one sitting. If you normally drink two glasses of wine, make it one instead.
  • If you are drinking too much, avoid people, places, things and certain activities that trigger an urge to drink. For example, baby boomers love to splurge on dining out, but this luxury often prompts people to drink more. If this is the case, consider going out to dinner less often.
  • Find healthy alternatives for coping with stress, loneliness, or anger. For example, if you’re tempted to reach for a drink take a walk, garden, or take a long bubble bath.

Experts say that alcohol misuse among older people isn’t a problem that will simply disappear on its own. This new data should serve as a wake-up call to all baby boomers to examine their drinking habits.

Image courtesy of tiverylucky at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

4 thoughts on “Baby Boomers Warned About Over-Drinking as Alcohol-Related Deaths Soar

  1. Cat MIchaels

    Wow, Julie. I had no idea drinking was such a problem for our generation. I can cerainly understand the depression aspect leading one to reach for the glass. Do you think heavy drinking equates to being an alcoholic? Would AA help?

    Reply
    1. juliegorges Post author

      Now, that’s an interesting question, Cat, that called for a bit of research. A surprising finding based on survey data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health: 90 percent of excessive drinkers are not alcohol dependent, i.e., alcoholics. “This study shows that, contrary to popular opinion, most people who drink too much are not alcohol dependent,” says Robert Brewer, an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This means these people drink a lot, but don’t experience withdrawal symptoms when they stop drinking or report an increased tolerance for alcohol. They do, however, suffer from the increased risk of cancer and other diseases I mentioned in the article. There are several other criteria for alcohol dependence as well. But Brewer says it’s important to understand that the excessive drinkers who are not alcohol dependent are unlikely to need addiction treatment such as AA. They may also respond to interventions such as increased alcohol taxes to drink less.

      Reply
  2. Tracy Bryan

    Interesting stuff and makes so much sense. I personally live in a community (where a high percentage is baby boomers) and they drink like fish around here. So glad your spreading some awareness about substance abuse and offering ways to cut back. Unfortunately, the contemporary Madmen (and women) still promote the idea that drinking the right product leads to success and happiness though, so it would be nice if corporate America learns to take the sexy out of booze too…we can only keep fighting the fight I guess, huh. Great article Julie, chocked full of interesting statistics!

    Reply

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